A NETWORKED SELF PAPACHARISSI PDF

Reference. Section: Choose, Top of page, Reference <<. Madden, M, Zickuhr, K ( ) 65% of online adults use social networking sites. Available at. Zizi Papacharissi is an academic powerhouse. Whatever you've been doing for the last fifteen years, she probably makes you look lazy. A Networked Self examines self presentation and social connection in the digital age. This collection Zizi Papacharissi. Taylor & Francis, Jul.

Author: Tajin Tatilar
Country: Monaco
Language: English (Spanish)
Genre: Business
Published (Last): 8 July 2010
Pages: 459
PDF File Size: 12.5 Mb
ePub File Size: 17.11 Mb
ISBN: 979-9-93637-212-6
Downloads: 94191
Price: Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader: Maurisar

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again.

Open Preview See a Problem?

A Networked Self: Identity, Community, and Culture on Social Network Sites by Zizi Papacharissi

Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. A Networked Self examines self presentation pappacharissi social connection in the digital age. This collection brings together new work on online social networks by leading scholars from a variety of disciplines.

The focus of the volume rests on the construction of the self, and what happens to self-identity when it is presented through networks of social connections in new media e A Networked Self examines self presentation and social connection in the digital age. The focus of the volume rests on the construction of the self, and what happens to self-identity when betworked is presented through networks of social connections in new media environments.

The volume is structured around the core networied of identity, community, and culture – the central themes of social network sites.

A Networked Self: Identity, Community, and Culture on Social Network Sites

Paperbackpages. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about A Networked Selfplease sign up. Lists with This Book.

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Aug 16, Phoenix rated it really liked it Shelves: In most cases the approach was highly academic so this book may or may not interest a more general reader. I’m not an academic but Sefl am netwprked in how Social Network Software environments are analogous yet different than previous forms of interpersonal communication, and the different roles they play in personal and professional l A Blurring of Lines Between Private and Public A collection of papers delivered at a 1 day conference on social networks the University of Illinois in May of I’m not an academic but I am interested in how Social Network Software environments are analogous yet different than previous forms of interpersonal communication, and the different roles they play in personal and professional life.

There is a strong keynote chapter by A. Barabasi on the growth of freescale networks.

A Networked Self: Identity, Community, and Culture on Social Network Sites – Google Books

Delightful analogy relating Bose-Einstein condensation to “winner take all” growth. Very useful take on the ability networkwd market latecomers ie: Google, Facebook to achieve and maintain network dominance, mitigated by the paradox that as they grow the market they will continue to grow in size, but overall percentage will shrink. Interesting to think about if you intend to beat Google at their own game.

The only meme I think is missing from this paper is a reference to Metcalf’s Law. The value of a network is proportional to the square of the number of nodes – the larger the network the cheaper the relative cost of joining to the point where the benefit of joining a competing network is exponentially less. Ch 1 was not as strong as the keynote. It asks why CMC computer mediated communication is different and worthy of study.

Umm, if not why would one choose to be reading this book? Even if it weren’t the media provides a self documenting laboratory to examine characteristics of human behaviour. It did set out some sense of a basic program of study, but it was introductory.

  ERBEN KYTICE PDF

Ch 2 by danah boyd asks to what extent Nwtworked based groups can be considered to be communities. She recognizes the “messiness” of the analogy but does not choose to force it; rather she explores different modes in which people communicate such as through profiles, walls, comments, visible and invisible participants lurkers and Collapsed Contexts. An example of a CC given was that of 60s political activist Stokely Carmichael who ppacharissi “talk black” to a black audience, but papadharissi white” to a white or mixed one.

When faced with TV he netwokred the former which alienated the latter. A bit before my time but I’m familiar with the name. Ch 9 has a similar example with targeted political campaigns. CC is a good concept papacharkssi know about. As a curious aside, I thought the lower case spelling of danah’s name to be an editor’s error in editing, but no, this is ms. Ch 3 was papacharossi whether or not online activity was addictive.

Negative effects were defined as depression and withdrawal leading towards alienation from family and work. The answer is yes, but it likely replaces other addictive activities, so it might even wind up being more healthy.

Also if you get turned off by mathematical terms such papachxrissi chi square tests, ANOVA and regressions I’m not you ;apacharissi want to skip it. He put forth the view that corporations were exploiting the free labour of users to add commercial value to their site without payment, and that employers and others would soon pressure employees to share their personal social nets for capital gain, in effect a colonization of private space.

In one sense it was perhaps the strongest paper in the book and he makes a number of good points. I’ve passed up commenting on papaxharissi online articles precisely because of the requirement of linking my post to my Facebook identity which I reserve solely for personal friends and family.

On the other hand Andrajevik doesn’t consider the aspect of free riders who exploit the provided service for their own use or jammers, both of which could provide a net negative value. Generally I find Marxist dialectic narrow and limiting, especially since we don’t really know what SNS is going to be.

I found myself poking holes in Andrajevik’s arguments but enjoyed him nonetheless. For a vg novel that follows through on this concept see “The Disincorporated Man”. Ch 5 is about the notion of community and asks whether or not the concept really applies to SNS. As such it relates well to Ch 2 and does cite danah boyd’s work.

Some sociologists feel that the traditional notion of community was undermined by modern urbanization and that the drive to SNS constitutes a form of nostalgia.

The paper has a good beginning but I wasn’t satisfied with the approach, and the discussion of “affordances” what a device or a piece of software allows you to do, ie: In particular it should have categorized and itemized what the affordances in SNS software were. Ch 6 picks up on a bit of this in discussing the nature of “social capital” papachafissi examines it in terms of benefits accruing to the participant. A good example would be this review eslf I’ve written.

I might have to ask myself why I am spending my free time writing it when, according to Ch 4, Amazon is exploiting my efforts in order to profit by selling this book. On the other hand members of the public might benefit either by getting a sense of what the book is about instead of reading it, they might choose to get it from the public library, and public knowledge and the public good may be enhanced by greater knowledge of the subject.

A good review might also enhance slightly the reputation of the authors, if not with the public at large then their family and friends. I benefit in the sense that writing a summary acts as a long term virtually portable memory aid and by putting it in the public sphere I’m forced to reflect on and integrate what I’ve learned. I might even get a small ego boost if you click Yes at the bottom. Chapter 7 categorized users into 5 types: The breakdown into ethnic groups white, hispanic, afro-american, asian american ndtworked native american though was not particularly relevant to me as a Canadian as we tend to focus more on economic strata than ethnic heritage as a diversity issue.

  CLICK ORI BRAFMAN PDF

Math phobic readers might want to skim this chapters as well.

Chapter 8 was about adopting SNS in the workplace. Not much here that was new for me. Outline potential benefits and confirmed that a top down approach doesn’t work without explaining why. We failed to achieve global benefits with CRM – sales people and managers did not want to record or share information which they rightly regarded as personal.

Grass roots approaches such as messaging groups on BlackBerry were considered to be effective. Blog readers tended to be slightly more Republican but had significantly higher incomes than interpersonal site users. Most individuals surveyed used SNS media to find out more about their choices. An interesting result was the negative correlation between YouTube use and voting vs.

Another observation was that campaigning targeted towards specific constituencies backfired as it could be widely parodied or played back in other markets less sympathetic to the message.

Ch 11 was a disappointing examination of the use of Twitter among marketing personnel. Though the approach towards the analysis was interesting, most of the the traffic examined was about Twitter and SNS itself indicating that the subjects were just starting to get interested in SNS.

I didn’t feel that there was anything revealing about regular usage. On Fair Use and Copyright had little new to say and half of it was a public extract on fair use available on the Internet. Collective Narcissism in Facebook Photos was a pretty cool – it was an anthropological approach to categorizing the usage of photos by 1st year college students.

The subjects were using Facebook to present a self narrative of coming of age.

The author looked at both images and comments, most of which one would consider to be quite tame, and differences in frequencies of behaviour between men and women. Common categories were group vs. Overt sexuality was rare or intentionally campy. Most people knew they were aware of the public nature of the space. It’s a mobile platform with an Internet link. Components included a face recognition program that could identify you if you were a member of Sarah’s online “Friends” and voice recognition that could interpret simple questions.

By way of conversation it would update it’s and your status on Facebook and inform you of new postings of aelf online friends. The thesis was that people would networkwd better to AI if the programs made use of social knowledge. It was fun, interesting, and much too short! Because these are conference proceedings there isn’t as strong a focus as would be found in an authored book.

None of the essays examined social interaction in alternate realisms such as Second Life papacharissl lines in Ch 5 in any depth, gaming or differences between online and real world personae.

Overall it was an interesting read. Apr 22, Laurel rated it it was amazing. This is a collection of “theory and research on online social networks by leading scholars from a variety of disciplines”. It has been sitting on my work desk for about 6 months and I am pleased I now have time to read these essays. This was a very good collection of essays, and yes, research reports.